Case and Demographic Data

The most serious nonfatal occupational injury and illness cases involve lost worktime.  There were 24,000 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  This was a 5.4 percent increase from the 22,770 cases in 2003, but a decrease from the 26,802 cases in 2002.  One measure of the severity of lost worktime cases is the percent distribution.  A second measure of the severity of lost worktime cases is the median number of lost workdays.  The median days away from work designates the point at which half the cases involved more days and half the cases involved fewer days.  The median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in Missouri private industry were eight days in 2004, the same number of days as in 2003.

Demographic information provides details of characteristics of the injured or ill worker.  This information includes occupation, gender, age of worker, occupational group, length of service with employer at the time of the incident, and race or ethnic origin.  Four case characteristics are used to describe each nonfatal occupational injury or illness.  The nature of the injury or illness identifies the principal characteristics, or physical effects, of the injury or illness.  The part of body affected is identified for the involved worker.  The source of injury or illness identifies the object, substance, bodily motion, or exposure that directly produced or inflicted the injury or illness.  The event or exposure describes the manner in which the injury or illness was produced or inflicted by the source of the injury or illness.

Chart 1 shows the percent distribution of occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The two major events or exposures were contact with object, equipment accounting for 25.3 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work and overexertion accounting for 20.5 percent.

The percent distribution of occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness in Missouri private industry in 2004 is presented in Chart 2.  Three sources accounted for 62.1 percent of the cases: other accounted for 24.4 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work; floor, ground surfaces accounted for 19.9 percent; and worker motion or position accounted for 17.8 percent.

Chart 3 presents the percent distribution of occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The part of body most affected was trunk, accounting for 33.7 percent of the occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work.  Upper extremities was the second most affected part of body, accounting for 30.5 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses.  Lower extremities accounted for 20.7 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses.  These three parts of body accounted for 84.9 percent of the occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.

The percent distribution of occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness in Missouri private industry in 2004 is shown in Chart 4.  The primary nature of injury or illness was sprains, strains, which was the nature in 38.9 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work.  Other was the second most frequent nature, accounting for 16.9 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work.

Chart 5 shows the occupations with the most injuries and illnesses with days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The occupation with the most injuries and illnesses involving days away from work was truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer with 2,150 injury and illness cases with days away from work.  The occupation with the second most injuries and illnesses with days away from work in 2004 was laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand with 1,470 injuries and illnesses with days away from work.

Occupations with the highest median days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Chart 6.  Food service managers had the highest median days away from work at 179 days.  First-line supervisors/managers of food preparation and serving workers had the next highest median days away from work at 85 days.

Median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness by event or exposure in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Chart 7.  The event or exposure with the most median days away from work was transportation accidents with 48 median days away from work.  The event or exposure with the second highest median days away from work was fall to lower level with 17 days.

Chart 8 presents the median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness by source of injury or illness in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Vehicles was the source with the highest number of median days away from work at 21 days.  Health care patient and floors, walkways, ground surfaces were the sources with the next highest number of median days away from work in 2004 with 12 days each.

Chart 9 shows the median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness by part of body affected in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The part of body with the highest number of median days away from work was shoulder with 26 median days away from work.  Knee was the part of body with the second highest number of median days away from work at 19 days.

Median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness by nature of injury or illness in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Chart 10.  The nature of injury or illness with the highest number of median days away from work was amputations with 44 days.  Fractures was the nature with the second highest number of median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness in 2004 with 42 days.

Chart 11 presents the median days away from work due to nonfatal occupational injury or illness by age of worker in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Workers aged 55 to 64 had the highest number of median days away from work at 15 days.  The age category 35 to 44 had the second highest number of median days away from work in 2004 with 14 days.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by length of service in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Chart 12.  The highest distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work is in the length of service category of 1 to 5 years at 35.5 percent.  The next highest category is more than 5 years of service accounting for 28.6 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses.

Chart 13 presents the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by age of worker in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The age category with the highest distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work was 35 to 44 years with 29.3 percent.  The age category with the second highest percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses was 45 to 54 years with 22.1 percent.  The age category with the third highest percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses was 25 to 34 years with 21.1 percent.  If these three categories are combined, workers aged 25 to 54 years accounted for 72.5 percent of the occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by major occupational group in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Chart 14.  Transportation and material moving occupations was the occupational group with the highest distribution of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work at 22.1 percent.  Service occupations was the occupational group with the second highest distribution at 17.9 percent.

Chart 15 shows the number of occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for selected occupations in Missouri private industry in 2003 and 2004.  Of the selected occupations presented, truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer; construction laborers; and truck drivers, light or delivery services had increases in 2004.  Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand; and carpenters had decreases in 2004.

The case and demographic statistical data separates the private industries into goods-producing and service-providing.  The goods-producing major industry sectors are: natural resources and mining; construction; and manufacturing.  The service-providing major industry sectors are: trade, transportation and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; and other services.

Table 1 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and major industry sector in 2004 for Missouri private industry.  The worker characteristics presented are: sex; age; length of service with employer; and race or ethnic origin.  There were 24,000 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  This number was a 5.4 percent increase from the 22,770 cases in 2003, but a decrease from the 26,802 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in 2002.  The data is separated into goods-producing and service-providing sectors.  There were 8,490 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the total goods-producing sector, a slight increase over the 8,300 cases in 2003.  This accounted for 35.4 percent of all the nonfatal injuries and illnesses in private industry.  Manufacturing was the goods-producing major industry sector with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 4,830.  There were 15,510 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the total service-providing sector.  This was a 7.2 percent increase from the 14,470 cases in 2003.  The service-providing sector accounted for 64.6 percent of the all the nonfatal injuries and illnesses in private industry.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the service-providing major industry sector with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 7,560.

The age group with the largest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work was workers aged 35 to 44 years for Missouri private industry.  The 7,040 cases were increased 16.0 percent from 6,070 in 2003.  The age group 35 to 44 years also had the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector.  The length of service with employer category with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work was 1 to 5 years for private industry.  The 8,520 cases in that category in 2004 were a 6.9 percent increase from 7,970 cases in 2003.  The length of service with employer category with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector was more than 5 years and the category for the total service-providing sector was 1 to 5 years.  White only was the race or ethnic origin category with the most injuries and illnesses accounting for 63.0 percent of the total cases in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The 15,120 injuries and illnesses for White only workers in 2004 was an 11.9 percent increase from the 13,510 cases in 2003.  White only was also the race or ethnic origin with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for both the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and major industry sector in 2004 for Missouri private industry are shown in Table 2.  The worker characteristics are the same as the ones listed for Table 1.  In 2004, men had 64.6 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry.  Men accounted for 83.7 percent of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the total goods-producing sector and 54.1 percent in the total service-providing sector.  The age group 35 to 44 years had the highest distribution at 29.3 percent for private industry.  The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by age of worker in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Chart 13.  The age group 35 to 44 years also had the highest distribution at 29.6 percent for the total goods-producing sector and at 29.2 percent for the total service-providing sector.  The length of service with employer category 1 to 5 years had the highest distribution at 35.5 percent for private industry.  The percent distributions by length of service are shown in Chart 12.  More than 5 years was the length of service with employer with the highest distribution for the total goods-producing sector at 35.1 percent.  The category of length of service with the highest distribution for the total service-providing sector was 1 to 5 years at 37.6 percent.  White only was the race or ethnic origin with the highest percent distributions for private industry (63.0 percent), the total goods-producing sector (71.1 percent), and the total service-providing sector (58.5 percent).

Table 3 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by major occupational group and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004.   The major occupational group with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work was transportation and material moving occupations.  Transportation and material moving occupations had 5,310 (22.1 percent) of the total 24,000 nonfatal occupational injury and illness cases in 2004.  The major occupational group with the second most injuries and illnesses was production occupations with 4,200 nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work.  The major occupational group with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the total goods-producing sector was production occupations with 3,340 cases.  Transportation and material moving occupations had the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in the total service-providing sector with 4,390.

Table 4 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker occupations and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The selected occupation with the most injuries and illnesses in private industry was truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer with 2,150 cases.  The selected occupation with the second most injuries and illnesses in private industry was laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand with 1,470 cases.  Chart 5 shows the occupations with the most injuries and illnesses with days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Construction laborers was the selected occupation with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in 2004 in the total goods-producing sector with 780 cases.  Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer was the selected occupation with the most cases in the total service-providing sector in 2004 with 1,860 cases.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and major industry sector in 2004 for Missouri private industry are presented in Table 5.  The characteristics reported are: nature of injury, illness; part of body affected; source of injury, illness; and event or exposure.  Numbers for these characteristics are presented for private industry and each goods-producing and service-providing major industry sector.

Sprains, strains was the nature of injury, illness with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector in 2004.   Trunk was the part of body affected in most of the injuries and illnesses in 2004 for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  Upper extremities was the part of body affected in most of the injuries and illnesses in 2004 for the total goods-producing sectors.  The source of injury, illness with the highest number of injuries and illnesses in 2004 was floors, walkways, ground surfaces for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  Worker motion or position was the source of injury, illness with the highest number of injuries and illnesses in 2004 for the total goods-producing sector.  Contact with objects and equipment was the event or exposure leading to the most injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector in 2004.

Table 6 presents the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The characteristics are the same as those for Table 5.  The percent distributions are shown for private industry and for each goods-producing and service-providing major industry sectors.  Sprains, strains was the nature of injury, illness category with the highest percentage of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  The percent distribution by nature of injury or illness is shown in Chart 4 for Missouri private industry in 2004.  Trunk was the part of body affected with the highest percentage of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry and the total service-providing sector in 2004.  Upper extremities was the part of body affected with the highest percentage of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for the total goods-producing sector in 2004.  The percent distribution by part of body affected for Missouri private industry in 2004 is shown in Chart 3.  Floors, walkways, ground surfaces was the major source of injury, illness in private industry and the total service-providing sector in 2004.  Worker motion or position was the major source of injury, illness in the total goods-producing sector.  The percent distribution by source of injury or illness for private industry in Missouri in 2004 is shown in Chart 2.  Contact with objects and equipment was the major event or exposure in private industry, the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector in 2004.  The percent distribution by event or exposure is shown in Chart 1 for Missouri private industry in 2004.

The incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers for selected characteristics and major industry sector are shown in Table 7 for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The characteristics are the same as those described for Table 5.  Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 10,000 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 20,000,000 where

N = number of injuries and illnesses
EH = total hours worked by all employees during calendar year
20,000,000 = base for 10,000 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).

The incidence rate for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for Missouri private industry in 2004 was 128.3 per 10,000 full-time workers.  This was a 7.5 percent increase from the 2003 rate of 119.3, but a decrease from the incidence rate of 142.8 in 2002.  The incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector was 190.7, a slight decrease from the 2003 rate of 194.6.  Construction was the goods-producing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate at 281.2 down slightly from the 2003 rate of 285.3.  The incidence rate for the total service-providing sector was 108.8, up 11.4 percent from 97.7 in 2003.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the service-providing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate at 167.4, an increase from the 2003 rate of 154.6.

Sprains, strains was the nature of injury, illness with the largest incidence rate for Missouri private industry in 2004 at 50.0.  Sprains, strains was also the nature of injury, illness with the highest incidence rates for the total goods-producing sector (72.8) and the total service-providing sector (42.8) in 2004.  Trunk was the part of body affected with the largest incidence rate at 43.2 for Missouri private industry in 2004.  Upper extremities was the part of body affected with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector in 2004.  Trunk was the part of body affected with the highest incidence rates for the total service-providing sector in 2004.  The source of injury, illness with the highest incidence rate in Missouri private industry in 2004 was floors, walkways, ground surfaces at 25.5.  Worker motion or position was the source of injury, illness with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector in 2004.  Floors, walkways, ground surfaces was the source of injury, illness with the highest incidence rate for the total service-providing sector in 2004.  Contact with objects and equipment was the event or exposure with the highest incidence rate at 32.5 for Missouri private industry in 2004.  Contact with objects and equipment was the event or exposure with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector in 2004.

Table 8 shows the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and number of days away from work in 2004 in Missouri private industry.  The characteristics are the same as those described for Table 1.  The category 31 days or more had the highest percent distribution (26.4 percent) of the total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work.  The median days away from work are also listed for each characteristic.  The median days away from work for Missouri private industry in 2004 were eight days.  The median days away from work for men workers were ten days and for women workers were six days.  The age group with the most median days away from work was workers aged 55 to 64 with 15 median days away from work.  The median days away from work by age of worker is shown in Chart 11.  More than 5 years was the length of service with employer category with the most median days away from work in 2004 at 12 days.  White only was the race or ethnic origin category with the highest number of median days away from work in 2004 with ten.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by major occupational group and number of days away from work for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 9.  Median days away from work are also listed for each major occupational group.  Management occupations was the major occupational group with the most median days away from work at 38 days.  The largest percent (56.4) of cases in this occupational group had 31 days or more away from work.  Construction and extraction occupations had the second highest median days away from work at 24 days.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected occupations and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 10.  Median days away from work are also listed for each selected occupation.  First-line supervisors/managers of food preparation and serving workers had the highest number of median days away from work at 85 days.  Truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer had the second highest number of median days away from work at 62 days.

Table 11 presents the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected injury or illness characteristics and number of days away from work for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The characteristics are the same as those described for Table 5.  Median days away from work are also listed for each selected injury or illness characteristic.  The nature of injury, illness with the most median days away from work was amputations at 44 days.  (This is shown in Chart 10.) Fractures was the nature with the second highest median days away from work in 2004 with 42 days.  The part of body affected with the most median days away from work was shoulder at 26 days.  (This is plotted in Chart 9.) Knee had the second highest median days away from work at 19 days.  Vehicles was the source of injury, illness with the most median days away from work in 2004 at 21 days.  (This is shown in Chart 8.) Floors, walkways, ground surfaces; and health care patient were tied as the source of injury, illness with the next highest median days away from work in 2004 at 12 days each.  Transportation accidents was the event or exposure with the most median days away from work in 2004 with 48 days.  (This is plotted in Chart 7.) Fall to lower level was the event or exposure with the second highest median days away from work in 2004 at 17 days.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by major industry sector and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 12.  The largest percentage of cases for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector were 31 days or more away from work.  The median days away from work are listed for private industry and each major industry sector.  Private industry had eight median days away from work.  The total goods-producing sector had 10 median days away from work.  Construction was the goods-producing major industry sector with the most median days away from work with 19 days.  The total service-providing sector had seven median days away from work.  Information was the service-providing major industry sector with the highest number of median days away from work with 14 days.

Table 13 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by time, hours on the job, and weekday and major industry sector for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The time of event with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector was 8:01 A.M. to 12:00 noon.  This was the same time of event category with the most injuries and illnesses as in 2003.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most injuries and illnesses for private industry and the total service-providing sector was 2 hours to less than 4 hours.  The total goods-producing sector actually had more cases where the hours on the job before event occurred category was not reported, but where it was reported, the highest category was 2 hours to less than 4 hours.  This was the same hours on the job category as in 2003.  The day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry and the total service-providing sector was Wednesday.  Monday was the day with the most injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by time, hours on the job, and weekday and major industry sector for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 14.  The time of event category 8:01 A.M. to 12:00 noon accounted for 26.5 percent of private industry cases, 27.6 percent of total goods-producing cases, and 25.9 percent of total service-providing cases.  The hours on the job before event occurred category that accounted for 23.5 of the private industry cases and 25.5 percent of the total service-providing cases was 2 hours to less than 4 hours.  There were 21.8 percent of the cases in the total goods-producing sector where hours on the job before event occurred were not reported.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with reported hours with the most injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector was 2 hours to less than 4 hours with 19.7 percent of the cases.  Wednesday accounted for 20.3 percent of the occupational injury and illness cases for private industry and 20.1 percent of the cases for the total service-providing sector.  Monday accounted for 22.9 percent of the cases for the total goods-producing sector.

Table 15 shows the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by time, hours on the job, and weekday and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The median days away from work are shown for each characteristic.  The time of event with the highest number of median days away from work was 12:01 A.M. to 4:00 A.M. with 63 days.  Most (53.0 percent) of the cases that occurred between 12:01 A.M. to 4:00 A.M. had 31 days or more away from work.  The time of event category with the second highest number of median days away from work was 12:01 P.M. to 4:00 P.M.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most median days away from work was 8 hours to less than 10 hours with 15 days.  The majority (29.8 percent) of the cases that occurred during 8 hours to less than 10 hours on the job had 31 days or more away from work.  The category with the second highest number of median days away from work was 4 hours to less than 6 hours with 10 days.  Wednesday was the day of week with the highest number of median days away from work with 10 days.  Most (34.2 percent) of the cases occurring on Wednesday had 31 days or more away from work.  Tuesday was the day of the week with the second highest number of median days away from work at nine days.

Table 16 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry, sex, and age of worker in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work are listed by sex and age of worker for major industry sectors, industry sectors, and industries classified by NAICS codes.  The age of worker category with the most injuries and illnesses was 35 to 44 years for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Specialty trade contractors (NAICS 238) was the goods-producing industry with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 2,190.  Most of those cases, 2,170, involved men workers.  Building equipment contractors (NAICS 2382) was the goods-producing industry with the second most injuries and illnesses with 830.  All of those cases involved men workers.  Nursing and residential care facilities (NAICS 623) was the service-providing industry with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 1,300.  Most, 1,110, of those cases involved women workers.  General merchandise stores (NAICS 452) was the service-providing industry with the second most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with 830.  These cases involved 490 women workers and 340 men workers.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and race or ethnic origin of worker in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 17.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work are listed by race or ethnic origin for major industry sectors, industry sectors, and industries classified by NAICS codes. White only was the race or ethnic origin with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work with 15,120 cases, or 63 percent of the total cases.  The race or ethnic origin was not reported in 6,690 cases, or 27.9 percent of cases.  White only was the race or ethnic origin with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in all sectors and industries except for the industries that had not reported as the highest number.

Table 18 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and length of service with employer in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work are listed by length of service with employer for major industry sector, industry sectors, and industries classified by NAICS codes.  The length of service with employer category with the most injuries and illnesses was 1 to 5 years for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  The length of service with employer category with the second most injuries and illnesses in private industry and the total service-providing sector was more than 5 years.  More than 5 years was the length of service with employer category with the most injuries and illnesses in the total goods-producing sector and 1 to 5 years was the category with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses.

Table 19 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by occupation and major industry sector for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each occupation are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  There are 23 major groups of occupations.  Transportation and material moving occupations was the major occupation group with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry with 5,310 injury and illness cases.  Production occupations was the major occupation group with the second highest number of nonfatal occupational injury and illness cases in private industry with 4,200 cases.  Production occupations was the major occupation group with the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector with 3,340.  Construction and extraction occupations was the major occupation group with the second highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector with 2,950.  Transportation and material moving occupations was the major occupation group with the highest number of injuries and illnesses for the total service-providing sector at 4,390.  Food preparation and serving related occupations was the major occupation group with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector at 1,750.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 20.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work for each nature are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories of natures are: traumatic injuries and disorders; systemic diseases and disorders; symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions; and other diseases, conditions, and disorders.  Traumatic injuries and disorders accounted for 21,890 (91.2 percent) of the 24,000 total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Traumatic injuries and disorders was the major nature category with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Traumatic injuries to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, etc. was the traumatic injury and disorder with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Nervous system and sense organs diseases was the systemic disease and disorder with the most injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Symptoms was the symptom, sign, and ill-defined condition with the highest number of injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Mental disorders or syndromes/anxiety, stress, neurotic disorders was the other diseases, conditions, and disorders with the highest number of injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.

Table 21 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected by the injury or illness and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each part of body are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories for part of body affected are: head; neck, including throat; trunk; upper extremities; lower extremities; body systems; and multiple body parts.  Trunk had 8,080 (33.7 percent) of the 24,000 total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Trunk was the part of body with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  Upper extremities was the part of body affected with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in the total goods-producing sector.  Face was the subcategory of head with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Back, including spine, spinal cord was the subcategory of trunk with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Arm(s) was the subcategory of upper extremities with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  Finger(s), fingernail(s) was the subcategory of upper extremities with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector.  Leg(s) was the subcategory of lower extremities with the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 22.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work for each source of injury or illness are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories of source of injury or illness are: chemicals and chemical products; containers; furniture and fixtures; machinery; parts and materials; persons, plants, animals, and minerals; structures and surfaces; tools, instruments, and equipment; vehicles; other sources; and nonclassifiable.  Persons, plants, animals, and minerals accounted for 6,260 (26.1 percent) of the 24,000 total nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Persons, plants, animals, and minerals was the source with the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Person–injured or ill worker was the subcategory of persons, plants, animals, and minerals with the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Structures and surfaces had the second highest numbers of injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.

Table 23 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure leading to injury or illness and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each event or exposure are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major event or exposure categories are: contact with objects and equipment; falls; bodily reaction and exertion; exposure to harmful substances or environments; transportation accidents; fires and explosions; assaults and violent acts; and nonclassifiable.  Bodily reaction and exertion was the event or exposure responsible for 9,340 (38.9 percent) of the 24,000 total nonfatal occupation injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Bodily reaction and exertion was the event with the highest number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Overexertion was the subcategory of bodily reaction and exertion with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  Contact with objects and equipment was the event with the second highest number of injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.

Incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers for selected natures of injuries or illnesses and major industry sector in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 24.  The incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each selected nature are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The categories of natures are the same as those listed for Table 20.  The nature category with the highest incidence rate for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry in Missouri in 2004 was traumatic injuries and disorders with an incidence rate of 117.0.  This incidence rate was increased 10.9 percent from the incidence rate of 105.5 in 2003, but decreased from the 2002 rate of 130.0.  The subcategory within traumatic injuries and disorders with the highest incidence rate was traumatic injuries to muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, etc. with an incidence rate of 50.4 for private industry.  Traumatic injuries and disorders was the nature with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector at 168.9.  Construction was the goods-producing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate for traumatic injuries and disorders at 257.6.  Traumatic injuries and disorders was the also the nature with the highest incidence rate for the total service-providing sector at 100.9.  Trade, transportation, and utilities was the service-providing major industry sector with the highest incidence rate for traumatic injuries and disorders at 158.7.  Systemic diseases and disorders was the major nature category with the second highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry in 2004 at 10.0.  Systemic diseases and disorders was the nature with the second highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector.

Table 25 presents the incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers for selected parts of body affected by injuries or illnesses and major industry sector in private industry in Missouri in 2004.  The incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each selected part of body are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories of part of body are the same as those listed for Table 21.  Trunk was the major part of body category with the highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work for private industry with an incidence rate of 43.2.  This was an increase from the 2003 rate of 41.6, but a reduction from the 2002 incidence rate of 47.8.  Back, including spine, spinal cord was the subcategory of trunk with the highest incidence rate for private industry at 24.6.  Upper extremities was the part of body with the highest incidence rate for total goods-producing sector with a rate of 63.8.  Trunk was the part of body with the highest incidence rate for the total service-providing sector at 37.7.  Upper extremities was the major part of body category with the second highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for private industry in 2004 at 39.1.  Trunk was the part of body with the second highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector at 60.8.  Upper extremities was the part of body with the second highest incidence rate for the total service-providing sector at 31.4.

Table 26 shows the incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers for selected sources of injuries or illnesses and major industry sector in 2004 for Missouri private industry.  The incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each selected source of injury or illness are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories of sources are the same as those listed for Table 22.  In private industry, the major source category with the highest incidence rate for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work was persons, plants, animals, and minerals with an incidence rate of 33.5.  This was a 9.5 percent increase from the 2003 incidence rate of 30.6, but a decrease from the 2002 rate of 36.7.  Within the persons, plants, animals, and minerals category, the subcategory with the highest incidence rate for private industry was person–injured or ill worker at 23.3.  Persons, plants, animals, and minerals was the source with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector at 41.3 and 31.0, respectively.  Structures and surfaces was the source category with the second highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in private industry in 2004 at 27.9.  Structures and surfaces was the source with the second highest incidence rate for both the total goods-producing sector and the total service-providing sector.

Incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time workers for selected events or exposures leading to injuries or illnesses and major industry sector in 2004 in Missouri private industry are shown in Table 27.  The incidence rates for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for each selected event or exposure are listed for each goods-producing major industry sector and service-providing major industry sector.  The major categories of events or exposures are the same as those listed for Table 23.  The major category of event with the highest incidence rate for nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses with days away from work for private industry was bodily reaction and exertion with an incidence rate of 49.9.  This was a reduction from the 2003 rate of 52.2 and the 2002 incidence rate of 60.6.  Overexertion was the major subcategory within bodily reaction and exertion with the highest incidence rate at 26.3 for private industry.  Bodily reaction and exertion was the event with the highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector at 77.1.  Bodily reaction and exertion was also the event with the highest incidence rate for the total service-providing sector at 41.4.  Contact with objects and equipment was the major event category with the second highest incidence rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work in private industry in 2004 at 32.5.  Contact with objects and equipment was the event with the second highest incidence rate for the total goods-producing sector at 58.4.  Contact with objects and equipment, and falls were the events with the next highest incidence rates for the total service-providing sector, both at 24.3.

Table 28 presents the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and number of days away from work in 2004 in Missouri private industry.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Industries are listed as major industry sectors, sectors, and by NAICS codes.  Median days away from work are also listed for each of the major industry sectors, sectors, and industries.  The goods-producing industry sector with the most median days away from work was mining (NAICS 21) with 25 days.  The goods-producing industry with the most median days away from work was dairy product manufacturing (NAICS 3115) with 50 days.  The service-providing industry sector with the highest number of median days away from work was transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) with 24 days.  The service-providing industry with the highest number of median days away from work was personal and household goods repair and maintenance (NAICS 8114) with 48 days.  Similar data for the major industry sectors only is presented in Table 12.

Table 29 shows the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by selected worker characteristics and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The percent of cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  The characteristics listed are: sex; age; length of service with employer; and race or ethnic origin.  Median days away from work are also listed for each characteristic.  Similar data are also presented in Table 8.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by occupation and number of days away from work in 2004 in Missouri private industry are shown in Table 30.  There are 23 major groups of occupations.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Median days away from work are also listed for each occupation.  Management occupations was the major occupation group with the highest number of median days away from work at 38 days.  Construction and extraction occupations was the major occupation group with the second highest median days away from work at 24 days.  Sheet metal workers; and construction and related workers, all others were the occupations with the highest median days away from work in 2004 at 180 days each.  Food service managers was the occupation with the next highest median days away from work at 179 days.  Similar data for major occupational groups only is shown in Table 9.

Table 31 presents the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The major categories of natures are the same as those listed for Table 20.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Median days away from work are also listed for each nature.  Other diseases, conditions, and disorders was the major nature category with the highest number of median days away from work at 30 days.  Systemic diseases and disorders was the major nature category with the second highest median days away from work at 11 days.  The nature that had the highest median days away from work was other traumatic injuries and disorders, n.e.c. (not elsewhere classified) with 100 median days away from work.  Amputations, fingertip; and fractures and other injuries were the natures with the next highest median days away from work at 44 days.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected by the injury or illness and number of days away from work in 2004 in Missouri private industry are presented in Table 32.  The major categories of part of body are the same as listed for Table 21.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Median days away from work are also listed for each part of body.  Multiple body parts was the major part of body category with the most median days away from work at 12 days.  Lower extremities was the major part of body category with the second highest median days away from work at 11 days.  Elbow(s) was the part of body category with the most median days away from work at 180 days.  Multiple back regions was the part of body category with the second highest number of median days away from work at 164 days.

Table 33 shows the percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness and number of days away from work in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The categories of sources are the same as those defined for Table 22.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Median days away from work are also listed for each source.  Vehicles was the major source category with the highest number of median days away from work with 21 days.  Structures and surfaces was the major source category with the second highest number of median days away from work at 11 days.  Oxygen tanks (containers – pressurized); bucket or basket hoist – truck mounted (elevators); stairs, steps – outdoors; and semitrailer, tractor trailer, trailer truck (truck) were the sources with the highest number of median days away from work with 180 days each.  Rocks, crushed stone was the source with the next highest number of median days away from work at 125 days.

The percent distribution of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure leading to injury or illness and number of days away from work are shown in Table 34 for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The major event or exposure categories are the same as those listed for Table 23.  The percent of total cases are presented for: 1 day; 2 days; 3 to 5 days; 6 to 10 days; 11 to 20 days; 21 to 30 days; and 31 days or more.  Median days away from work are also listed for each characteristic.  Transportation accidents was the major event category with the most median days away from work with 48 days.  Assaults and violent acts was the major event category with the second highest number of median days away from work at 21 days.  Moving in the same direction (collision between vehicles, mobile equipment; highway accident) and overturned (noncollision accident; nonhighway accident, except rail, air, water) were the events with the highest number of median days away from work with 180 days each.  Bodily reaction, n.e.c. had the next highest median days away from work with 70 days.

Table 35 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and time of event for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The time of event category with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  The sectors which had the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work during the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon were manufacturing (NAICS 31-33); wholesale trade (NAICS 42); utilities (NAICS 22); educational services (NAICS 61); health care and social assistance (NAICS 62); arts, entertainment, and recreation (NAICS 71); and other services, except public administration (NAICS 81).  The sectors which had the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work during the time of event category 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm were agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting (NAICS 11); construction (NAICS 23); retail trade (NAICS 44-45); information (NAICS 51); finance and insurance (NAICS 52); and real estate and rental and leasing (NAICS 53).  Accommodation and food services (NAICS 72) had the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work from 4:01 pm to 8:00 pm.  The time of event with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) was 12:01 am to 4:00 am.  The time of event for mining (NAICS 21) was not reported for any cases.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and hours worked for Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 36.  The category of hours on the job before event occurred with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses was 2-4 hours for private industry, the total goods-producing sector, and the total service-providing sector.  The industry sectors that had a different reported hours on the job before event occurred category with the most injuries and illnesses were construction (NAICS 23); information (NAICS 51); and real estate and rental and leasing (NAICS 53).  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most injuries and illnesses for these three sectors was 6-8 hours.

Table 37 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by industry and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004.  Wednesday was the day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for private industry and the total service-providing sector.  Monday was the day of week with the most injuries and illnesses for the total goods-producing sector.  Most of the nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work occurred between Monday and Thursday for the individual sectors.  Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting (NAICS 11); construction (NAICS 23); manufacturing (NAICS 31-33); and utilities (NAICS 22) had the most injuries and illnesses on Monday.  Wholesale trade (NAICS 42); educational services (NAICS 61); arts, entertainment, and recreation (NAICS 71); and other services, except public administration (NAICS 81) had the most injuries and illnesses on Tuesday.  Transportation and warehousing (NAICS 48-49) and health care and social assistance (NAICS 62) had the most injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  Mining (NAICS 21) had the same number of injuries and illnesses on both Tuesday and Wednesday.  Retail trade (NAICS 44-45); finance and insurance (NAICS 52); real estate and rental and leasing (NAICS 53); and accommodation and food services (NAICS 72) had the most injuries and illnesses on Thursday.  Information (NAICS 51) was the only sector that had the most injuries and illnesses on Friday.

Table 38 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by occupation and time of event in Missouri private industry in 2004.  There are 20 major occupation groups listed along with occupations by occupation code.  The time of event with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for all occupations was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  This is the same category that had the most injuries and illnesses in 2003.  Most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work occurred between 8:01 am and 4:00 pm for individual major occupational groups.  Community and social services occupations (SOC 21-0000); education, training, and library occupations (SOC 25-0000); arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations (SOC 27-0000); healthcare support occupations (SOC 31-0000); personal care and service occupations (SOC 39-0000); office and administrative support occupations (SOC 43-0000); production occupations (SOC 51-0000); and transportation and material moving occupations (SOC 53-0000) were the major occupation groups with the most reported injuries and illnesses during the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  The time of event category 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm had the most reported injuries and illnesses for management occupations (SOC 11-0000); architecture and engineering occupations (SOC 17-0000); healthcare practitioners and technical occupations (SOC 29-0000); building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (SOC 37-0000); sales and related occupations (SOC 41-0000); construction and extraction occupations (SOC 47-0000); and installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (SOC 49-0000).  Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations (SOC 45-0000) had the same number of reported injuries and illnesses at 8:01 am to 12:00 noon and at 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  Business and financial operations occupations (SOC 13-0000) and food preparation and serving related occupations (SOC 35-0000) had the most reported injuries and illnesses during the time of event category 4:01 pm to 8:00 pm.  Data were not available for computer and mathematical occupations (SOC 15-0000) and protective service occupations (SOC 33-0000).

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by occupation and hours worked in Missouri private industry in 2004 is shown in Table 39.  There are 20 major occupational groups listed along with occupations by occupation code.  The hours on the job before event occurred with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in all occupations was 2-4 hours.  This was the same hours on the job before event occurred category with the most reported injuries and illnesses in 2003.  Most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by major occupation group occurred between two and eight hours on the job.  Management occupations (SOC 11-0000); community and social services occupations (SOC 21-0000); education, training, and library occupations (SOC 25-0000); food preparation and serving related occupations (SOC 35-0000); personal care and service occupations (SOC 39-0000); office and administrative support occupations (SOC 43-0000); production occupations (SOC 51-0000); and transportation and material moving occupations (SOC 53-0000) were the major occupational groups that had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the 2-4 hours on the job before event occurred category.  The hours on the job before event occurred category 4-6 hours was the highest category for the major occupational groups of arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations (SOC 27-0000); healthcare support occupations (SOC 31-0000); sales and related occupations (SOC 41-0000); and construction and extraction occupations (SOC 47-0000).  Architecture and engineering occupations (SOC 17-0000); healthcare practitioners and technical occupations (SOC 29-0000); building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (SOC 37-0000); farming, fishing, and forestry occupations (SOC 45-0000); and installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (SOC 49-0000) had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the 6-8 hours on the job before event occurred category.  Business and financial operations occupations (SOC 13-0000) had the same number of reported injuries and illnesses in less than 1 hour and 8-10 hours on the job before event occurred categories.  Data were not available for computer and mathematical occupations (SOC 15-0000) and protective service occupations (SOC 33-0000).

Table 40 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by occupation and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004.  There are 20 major occupational groups listed along with occupations by occupation code.  Wednesday was the day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in all occupations.  The majority of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work occurred between Monday and Thursday.  Community and social services occupations (SOC 21-0000); arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media occupations (SOC 27-0000); farming, fishing, and forestry occupations (SOC 45-0000); construction and extraction occupations (SOC 47-0000); and production occupations (SOC 51-0000) had the most injuries and illnesses on Monday.  The major occupational groups with the most injuries and illnesses on Tuesday were architecture and engineering occupations (SOC 17-0000); healthcare support occupations (SOC 31-0000); and protective service occupations (SOC 33-0000).  Education, training, and library occupations (SOC 25-0000); healthcare practitioners and technical occupations (SOC 29-0000); and transportation and material moving occupations (SOC 53-0000) were the major occupational groups with the highest number of injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  The major occupational groups with the highest number of injuries and illnesses on Thursday were food preparation and serving related occupations (SOC 35-0000); sales and related occupations (SOC 41-0000); and office and administrative support occupations (SOC 43-0000).  Business and financial operations occupations (SOC 13-0000) had the highest number of injuries and illnesses on Tuesday and Thursday.  Management occupations (11-0000) and personal care and service occupations (SOC 39-0000) had the most injuries and illnesses on Sunday.  Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (SOC 49-0000) had the most injuries and illnesses on Friday.  The only major occupational group that had the most injuries and illnesses on Saturday was building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (SOC 37-0000).  Data was not available for computer and mathematical occupations (SOC 15-0000).

The numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness and time of event in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 41.  The categories of natures are: traumatic injuries and disorders; systemic diseases and disorders; symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions; other diseases, conditions, and disorders; and anxiety, stress, neurotic disorders.  The time of event with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all natures was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  This was the time of event with the most injuries and illnesses reported in 2003.  Traumatic injuries and disorders had the most reported injuries and illnesses during the time of event 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  Systemic diseases and disorders had the highest number of reported injuries and illnesses at both 4:01 am to 8:00 am and 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  The time of event with the highest reported number of injuries and illnesses for symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions was tied between 8:01 am to 12:00 noon and 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  Data were not available for other diseases, conditions, and disorders; and anxiety, stress, neurotic disorders.

Table 42 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness and hours worked in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The categories of natures are the same as those listed for Table 41.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all natures was 2-4 hours.  This is the same category that had the most injuries and illnesses in 2003.  The hours on the job before event occurred was not reported for many of the natures.  Traumatic injuries and disorders had the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses during 2-4 hours on the job before event occurred.  Less than 1 hour was the hours on the job before event occurred category with the most reported injuries and illnesses for systemic diseases and disorders.  The most reported injuries and illnesses for symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions occurred 6-8 hours on the job before event occurred.  Data were not available for other diseases, conditions, and disorders; and anxiety, stress, neurotic disorders.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by nature of injury or illness and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 43.  The categories of natures are the same as those listed for Table 41.  The day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all natures was Wednesday.  Traumatic injuries and disorders had the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  Tuesday was the day of week with the most injuries and illnesses for systemic diseases and disorders.  Symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions had the most injuries and illnesses on Thursday.  Other diseases, conditions, and disorders; and anxiety, stress, neurotic disorders did not have data available for which day of week had the most injuries and illnesses.

Table 44 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected and time of event in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The categories of part of body are the same as those listed for Table 21.  The time of event with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all parts of body was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  This is the time of event that had the most injuries and illnesses in 2003.  The time of event with the most reported occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for major part of body categories occurred between 8:01 am and 4:00 pm.  The parts of body with the most reported occupational injuries and illnesses in the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon were trunk, upper extremities, lower extremities, and multiple body parts.  Head; neck, including throat; and body systems had the most injuries and illnesses during the time of event 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected and hours worked for private industry in Missouri in 2004 are shown in Table 45.  The categories of part of body are the same as those listed for Table 21.  The category of hours on the job before event occurred with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all parts of body was 2-4 hours.  This is the same hours on the job before event occurred category that had the most injuries and illnesses in 2003.  The highest number of reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work for the major part of body categories occurred between two and eight hours on the job.  The part of body categories head, trunk, upper extremities, lower extremities, and multiple body parts had the most reported injuries and illnesses during 2-4 hours on the job before event occurred.  Neck, including throat had the most reported injuries and illnesses during the category 4-6 hours on the job before event occurred.  Body systems had the most reported injuries and illnesses during the category 6-8 hours on the job before event occurred.

Table 46 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by part of body affected and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The categories of part of body are the same as those listed for Table 21.  The day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all parts of body was Wednesday.  Most injuries and illnesses classified by part of body affected occurred on Wednesday, but the highest number of injuries and illnesses for each part of body occurred between Monday and Thursday.  Head, upper extremities, lower extremities, and multiple body parts each had the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  Monday was the day of week with the most injuries and illnesses for trunk.  Neck, including throat, had the most injuries and illnesses on Tuesday.  Thursday was the day of week with the most injuries and illnesses for body systems.

Table 47 presents the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness and time of event in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The major categories of sources are the same as those listed for Table 22.  The time of event category with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all sources was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  This was the time of event with the most injuries and illnesses in 2003.  The highest number of reported injuries and illnesses by major categories of sources occurred between 8:01 am and 4:00 pm.  Chemicals and chemical products; containers; furniture and fixtures; machinery; structures and surfaces; and tools, instruments, and equipment had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  Parts and materials; persons, plants, animals, and minerals; vehicles; and nonclassifiable had the most reported injuries and illnesses during 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  Other sources had the most reported injuries and illnesses tied between the time of event categories 8:01 am to 12:00 noon and 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness and hours worked in Missouri private industry in 2004 is presented in Table 48.  The major categories of sources are the same as those listed for Table 22.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all sources was 2-4 hours.  This was the same hours on the job before event category with the highest number of reported injuries and illnesses in 2003.  Most of the reported injuries and illnesses classified by source occurred in the category 2-4 hours on the job before event occurred.  The highest number of reported injuries and illnesses with days away from work for major source categories occurred between 1 and 8 hours on the job.  Chemicals and chemical products; containers; machinery; persons, plants, animals, and minerals; structures and surfaces; tools, instruments, and equipment; and vehicles had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the hours on the job before event occurred category 2-4 hours.  Furniture and fixtures had the most reported injuries and illnesses 1-2 hours on the job before event occurred.  The hours on the job category 4-6 hours before event occurred had the most reported injuries and illnesses for other sources.  Parts and materials had the most reported injuries and illnesses at 6-8 hours on the job before event occurred.  Nonclassifiable did not have any reported injuries and illnesses in any of hours on the job before event occurred categories.

Table 49 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by source of injury or illness and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004.  The major categories of sources are the same as those listed for Table 22.  The day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all sources was Wednesday.  Most reported injuries and illnesses by major source category occurred on Tuesday, but the source categories had the highest number of injuries and illnesses occurring between Monday and Saturday.  Chemical and chemical products; parts and materials; persons, plants, animals, and minerals; and structures and surfaces had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Tuesday.  Machinery and vehicles had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  Thursday was the day of week with the most reported injuries and illnesses for containers, and furniture and fixtures.  Monday was the day of week with the highest number of reported injuries and illnesses for tools, instruments, and equipment.   Nonclassifiable had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Friday.  Other sources had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Saturday.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure and time of event in Missouri private industry in 2004 are presented in Table 50.  The major categories of event or exposure are the same as those listed for Table 23.  The time of event category with the most reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all events was 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  This was the category with the most reported events in 2003.  Most of the reported nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses classified by event or exposure occurred during the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  The highest numbers of reported injuries and illnesses with days away from work in major event or exposure categories occurred between 12:01 am and 4:00 pm.  Falls; bodily reaction and exertion; exposure to harmful substances or environments; and fires and explosions had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the time of event category 8:01 am to 12:00 noon.  Assaults and violent acts had the most reported injuries and illnesses in the time of event category 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  Contact with objects and equipment had a tie for the most reported injuries and illnesses in the time of event categories 8:01 am to 12:00 noon and 12:01 pm to 4:00 pm.  The time of event 12:01 am to 4:00 am was the category with the most reported injuries and illnesses for transportation accidents.  There were no reported times of event for nonclassifiable events or exposures.

Table 51 shows the number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure and hours worked for Missouri private industry in 2004.  The major categories of event or exposure are the same as those listed for Table 23.  The hours on the job before event occurred category with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses was 2-4 hours for all events.  This was the same category with the most reported injuries and illnesses for all events in 2003.  All major categories of events or exposures except nonclassifiable had the most reported injuries and illnesses at 2-4 hours on the job before event occurred.  The hours on the job before event occurred categories with the most injuries and illnesses for fires and explosions was tied between 2-4 hours and 4-6 hours on the job before event occurred.  There were no reported hours on the job before event occurred injury or illness cases for nonclassifiable events or exposures.

The number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work by event or exposure and day of week in Missouri private industry in 2004 are shown in Table 52.  The major categories of event or exposure are the same as those listed for Table 23.  The day of week with the most nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses for all events was Wednesday.  Tuesday was the day of week when most major event or exposure categories had the most injuries and illnesses.  Contact with objects and equipment; falls; and bodily reaction and exertion were the events and exposures that had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Tuesday.  Monday was the day of week with the most reported injuries and illnesses for exposure to harmful substances or environments, and fires and explosions.  Transportation accidents had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Wednesday.  Thursday was the day of week with the most reported injuries and illnesses for assaults and violent acts.  Nonclassifiable had the most reported injuries and illnesses on Friday.