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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 29, 2011

Missouri's Fatal Workplace Injuries Down by 25% in 2010
Missouri Department of Labor Releases 2010 Figures

Jefferson City, Mo—The Department of Labor releases its annual workplace fatality statistics and found that a preliminary total of 107 fatal work injuries were recorded in Missouri in 2010, down approximately 25 percent from the 142 fatal work injuries reported for 2009. Nationally, fatal work injuries remained about the same for 2010.

“The Department has been working hard to promote the free workplace safety programs we offer to employers that save lives. Since this administration came into office, participation in the state’s elite safety program has increased by 56 percent,” says Department Director Larry Rebman. “This drop in fatalities shows that workplaces are embracing safety and doing more to protect workers.”  

In 2010, the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting sector had the most occupational fatalities in Missouri with 25. Crop production accounted for 23 of the 25 fatalities in the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting sector. The construction sector had the second most occupational fatalities with 12. The specialty trade contractors accounted for eight of the 12 fatalities in the construction sector in Missouri in 2010.

Transportation incidents, which include highway, non-highway, air, water, rail fatalities, and fatalities resulting from being struck by a vehicle, were the leading event or exposure of fatal work injuries in Missouri in 2009 and again in 2010 accounting for 60 of the 107 fatalities in 2010. The agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting sector accounted for 18 of the 60 transportation incidents in 2010 in Missouri, followed by the construction sector with seven transportation incidents.

Men were the victims in 100 of the 107 fatal work injuries that occurred in Missouri in 2010. White, non-Hispanic workers accounted for 96 of the fatalities in 2010. Workers between the ages of 45 to 54 years had the most fatalities accounting for 25 of the 107 fatal work injuries in 2010. Workers between the ages of 35 to 44 years accounted for 23 of the fatal work injuries in 2010. In 2010, wage and salary workers had the most fatalities with 71. 

The data is collected by the Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Research and Analysis Section in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor and analyzed by the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI). The U.S. Department of Labor’s BLS, in conjunction with state agencies developed the CFOI program in 1992 to produce accurate, comprehensive, descriptive, timely, and accessible counts of fatal workplace injuries that occur during a given year.  A fatality is counted in the state where the incident occurred regardless of the state of employment to alleviate duplication of reporting in the states. The BLS compiles and analyzes all fatal work injuries occurring in the U.S. and releases its yearly report sometime in fall of the following year.

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries data for Missouri can be found at www.labor.mo.gov/Lmi/Oii.asp.

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Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

421 East Dunklin Street, P.O. Box 504, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0504
Phone: 573-751-7500 Fax: 573-751-6552